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Araucaria bidwillii (Bunya Pine)

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Helpful articles

How to plant. Learn how to plant correctly. Planting correctly will not only get your garden off to a flying start, but it will also ensure that your plants's root systems develop as healthily as possible, maximising their long-term stability.

Gymea Lilies - Doryanthes excelsa. Everything about the Gymea lily (Doryanthes excelsa) is larger than life. The bold foliage can reach over four metres in height and some majestic flower stems can reach over ten metres tall.

External privacy screens. External privacy screens began to appear in Australian residential and commercial building during the 1950's and 1960's, as a direct result of high density living and higher incomes. For more information and some examples read this article.

The Rose. Learn all about roses. How to grow and care for them, history, and more.

Plant description

araucaria bidwillii bunya pine 003

araucaria bidwillii bunya pine 002

araucaria bidwillii bunya pine 001 001

A very large, stately specimen tree that is often seen in historical gardens as it was widely planted on large country estates. Its domed shape is its very distinctive feature but it should be stressed that this tree needs a lot of space and should not be planted within 10 metres of any structures. It needs no regular pruning, however, its arge seed cones are extremely heavy and present a safety hazard in public areas when they fall from the tree so warning sugnage should be used. The nuts are edible and are very tasty when roasted as was done by Aboriginal people through hostory.

Further reading: Australian Native Trees and Top Gum Trees for Gardens (articles written by native plant expert Angus Stewart).

Additional plant information

Flowers

Flower colour: Green
Flowering season: spring

Plant size

Maximum height: 35 metres
Minimum height: 25 metres

Maximum width: 15 metres
Minimum width: 10 metres

Sunlight, frost & salt tolerance

This plant will tolerate full or partial sunlight.
Medium frost tolerance.
Plant is not salt tolerant.

Fauna attracting?

Yes. Attracts: seed feeding birds.

Climate

This plant species will grow in the following climates: temperate, subtropical.

Soil types & conditions

Loam: dry, moist, well-drained.

Clay: dry, well-drained.

Sand: dry, moist, well-drained.

Soil pH: 5.5-6.5

Miscellaneous information

Native to: Australia.

Planting season: all year.

Types of fertiliser: general purpose.

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