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Euphorbia characias 'Blackbird' (Euphorbia, Spurge)

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Helpful articles

Best Australian natives for pots & small gardens. The trend towards smaller gardens has inspired the plant lovers in the nursery industry to respond with an ever-increasing range of Australian plants that will delight those who want to attract birds and butterflies and bring a little bit of the bush onto their balconies. From banksias to bottlebrush there are plants that will add colour and texture to provide year round interest.

Grevilleas. Learn all about grevilleas from native plant expert Angus Stewart.

External privacy screens. External privacy screens began to appear in Australian residential and commercial building during the 1950's and 1960's, as a direct result of high density living and higher incomes. For more information and some examples read this article.

Attracting fauna to your garden. This article explains how you can attract native australian wildlife to your garden.

Plant description

Euphorbia ' Blackbird' is a perennial succulent plant with eye catching dark foliage and contrasting lime yellow flowers. The new growth is deep purple which matures to a bronzed green. It has a compact growth habit, and is ornamental all year round. It is very tolerant of hot and dry conditions. It flowers from late winter through to spring. It is salt and frost tolerant. It is good for water-wise gardens, and grows well in containers. Suits most soil types, provided they are free draining. Fertilise in spring with a slow release fertiliser.

Euphorbias have a caustic, poisonous  milky sap. Contact with mucous membranes can produce inflammation, keep away from the eyes as the sap can cause blindness.

 

Additional plant information

Flowers

Flower colour: yellow
Flowering season: spring winter

Plant size

Maximum height: 0.4 metres
Minimum height: not specified

Maximum width: 0.6 metres
Minimum width: not specified

Sunlight, frost & salt tolerance

This plant will tolerate full sunlight.
Medium frost tolerance.
Plant is salt tolerant.

Fauna attracting?

Yes. Attracts: Butterflies and moths.

Climate

This plant species will grow in the following climates: cool, temperate, subtropical, tropical, arid.

Soil types & conditions

Loam: dry, moist, well-drained.

Clay: well-drained.

Sand: dry, moist, well-drained.

Soil pH: 6.1-7.5

Pests

Caterpillars

Miscellaneous information

Planting season: Any.

Types of fertiliser: Slow release fertiliser applied in spring.

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