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Aechmea weilbachii (Bromeliad)

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Helpful articles

Grevilleas for Cold Climates. Live in a colder part of Australia. These grevilleas for can handle it.

Native grasses and friends. An exciting thing is happening in the world of Australian plants. Wild species that have tantalised gardeners in the past are now being improved to create a diverse palette of new varieties that offer all kinds of advantages. In particular, the necessity for water-wise, low maintenance gardens has inspired interest in plants that can be used as ground covers that will not only suppress weeds and erosion but also look fantastic.

Native Hibiscus. An ever increasing interest in native hibiscus has led to the horticultural development of a number of new cultivars which rival the exotic types in beauty and flower size.

Australian Native Orchids. Native orchids range from the spectacular epiphytic (growing on trees) and lithophytic (growing on rocks) species of the tropical jungles and warmer areas of Australia, to the intricately subtle terrestrial (growing in the ground) species found throughout the dry eucalypts forests throughout the continent.

Plant description

aechmea weilbachii bromeliad

Aechmea weilbachii is an attractive bromeliad that has long lasting purple flowers with red bracts from autumn to spring. It has soft shiny leaves, and readily forms clumps. It is relatively slow growing, and is not frost tolerant. It likes a semi shaded position, under trees with dappled shade suits them well, where they will provide colourful blooms.

Aechmeas are epiphytic plants, which naturally grow on trees or logs rather than in soil. They can be grown in the garden or pots if the soil has very good drainage. Orchid compost which has large bark pieces suits them well. The plant forms an urn shape, which holds water as well as nutrients from rotting leaves etc. In dry periods, spray the plant to boost the humidity and to fill the centre of the plant with water.

Propagate by division of the clump. Small offshoots called pups can be separated and grown on.

 

Additional plant information

Flowers

Flower colour: purple, red
Flowering season: spring autumn winter

Plant size

Maximum height: 0.7 metres
Minimum height: not specified

Maximum width: 0.5 metres
Minimum width: not specified

Sunlight, frost & salt tolerance

Will tolerate partial sunlight.
Light frost tolerance.
Plant is salt tolerant.

Fauna attracting?

Yes. Attracts: Frogs.

Climate

This plant species will grow in the following climates: temperate, subtropical, tropical.

Soil types & conditions

Loam: dry, moist, well-drained.

Clay: dry, moist, well-drained.

Sand: dry, wet, moist, well-drained.

Soil pH: 6.5-7.5

Diseases

Fungal rot if kept too wet

Miscellaneous information

Planting season: Any.

Types of fertiliser: not specified.

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